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Wearing Finger Picks



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Say hey Dell,
Great information for all of us! Oh, I thought about the Gel. The same friend that told me about layering silk, told me about gel (not Marc). This sounds great. I would do this, but I have a track record of busting off anything attached, and what it is attached to because I work with machines & tools. The constant breakage would be too costly for me. I know it would work for many other guitarists how who are much more carful than I. Yea; I would do it too, but…
Good stuff man!
Jimmy


Reply posted 7 months ago by Jim Lair


Thanks Marc,
Yup, our never ending experiment. I like the silk layering idea too. Another friend told me about it, but I haven’t done it yet. I didn’t know about rolling papers. Wow, adding baking soda? Who would have thunk?
Jimmy


Reply posted 7 months ago by Jim Lair


Hello,

I cannot imagine wearing "plastic thingies" on my fingers. In this regard, I would seriously consider "Gel" nails. Gel is not like acrylic - it does not damage the nail plate in any way whatsoever. Gel is also very robust. The Gel material works very well on nylon and steel strings, as well as being very durable.

One point is worth mentioning and that is at the very beginning you attach the Gel material to the existing nail plate - where generally when there is no protruding nail at all. Later, as the nail grows out, the Gel is actually becoming an integral part of the nail itself. What this can mean is that the Gel can actually be used to help build a natural nail and as some point the Gel can be completely removed. The nail plate is not hampered in any way by the Gel - as is so common with acrylic.

It is very important that you obtain the services of a competent nail Technician. There are those that do have experience with guitarists and these are the one to seek out. The Gel material that these nail Technicians use is the very same material that is used to perform dental work - and is therefore, very expensive.

Lastly, the use of Gel nails is a commitment in both time and money. I have to return every four weeks to have the nail plate "filled" as the result of the natural growth of the nail.


Reply posted 7 months ago by Dell Krauchi


Hello,

I cannot imagine wearing "plastic thingies" on my fingers. In this regard, I would seriously consider "Gel" nails. Gel is not like acrylic - it does not damage the nail plate in any way whatsoever. Gel is also very robust. The Gel material works very well on nylon and steel strings, as well as being very durable.

One point is worth mentioning and that is at the very beginning you attach the Gel material to the existing nail plate - where generally when there is no protruding nail at all. Later, as the nail grows out, the Gel is actually becoming an integral part of the nail itself. What this can mean is that the Gel can actually be used to help build a natural nail and as some point the Gel can be completely removed. The nail plate is not hampered in any way by the Gel - as is so common with acrylic.

It is very important that you obtain the services of a competent nail Technician. There are those that do have experience with guitarists and these are the one to seek out. The Gel material that these nail Technicians use is the very same material that is used to perform dental work - and is therefore, very expensive.

Lastly, the use of Gel nails is a commitment in both time and money. I have to return every four weeks to have the nail plate "filled" as the result of the natural growth of the nail.


Reply posted 7 months ago by Dell Krauchi


May have gotten something new: three different ideas :
Covering the tip of the nail with a tape to protect it for practice bout.
Adding bicarbonate to nail lacker would get them stoney hard.
Putting three layers while adding cigarette paper or fine silk between first and second layer.

While the first is available on an English website, I found them all on a French luthier website.


Reply posted 7 months ago by Marc Mony



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