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The dreaded Bar Chords
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Practice Routine



Practice Routine

I've been playing for approximately 11 months now and I feel like I'm not progressing as fast as I could be. I want to make sure that the time I spend practicing is effective and efficient. How would recommend someone with between 2-4 hours per day to practice to organize their practice schedule ? One other question, should you completely learn a song before starting a new song or is it okay to work on learning multiple songs at once? Okay more question (this is really the last one). On average, after one year, if someone told you they've been playing guitar for a year, what would you expect them to able to do?


Posted 1 year ago by Christopher Olivo - 7 replies

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Hi,needless to say I am a beginner joining this group playing past 3 years but not much time for the guitar as yourself. Learning has been pretty random not having any prior knowledge of music and no constructive advice from friends who are remarkable players. I would say it depends on your goals and why you are learning,fun or is it also your planned career( tho it should still be fun!) Do you want to learn accompaniment and sing along. Then start with a variety of songs with open chords and you will build your chord knowledge including common progressions as well as techniques of strumming,picking patterns ,hammer ons ,short picking solo like intros to songs etc. if you want to learn lead then scale knowledge and practice is essential. Often reading some relevant theory helps both areas such as understanding fretboard, position of notes and relate it to chords. Learning barre chords and moving up chords is essential and not being frightened away by oddly described chords. Listen to the songs you are learning. Keep a cheap guitar accessible and pick it up whenever rather than dedicated learning only. It is an amazing feeling when something just clicks after initially battling with it. Also don't forget to have your guitar set up properly. Keep going and have fun. From the "eternal learner".


Reply posted 6 months ago by Virjanand Panday


I think you want to be really good, really fast. Unless you're a prodigy, getting really good (whatever your definition of that is) on guitar is going to take practice and dedication. It's not impossible to reach whatever goal(s) you want to achieve on guitar.

I've learned (from lessons) to tackle one song at a time, as trying to learn multiple songs at once gets me overwhelmed and I feel discouraged. You need to go in to each practice session with a goal in mind, like "I'm gonna play this scale or song at ____ bpm (beats per minute)." Buy a metronome to keep time (and track your progress). In addition, you should practice scales and maybe learn a new technique each session (hammer on, pull offs, for example) and use your practice time to really get them down.

if someone's been playing guitar for a year I expect that they know basic chords (G, C, Am, D, F, E, Em), basic strumming patterns, the names of the strings, and simple strumming songs (like "Time of Your Life" by Green Day).


Reply posted 6 months ago by Jennifer Yamada


I think you want to be really good, really fast. Unless you're a prodigy, getting really good (whatever your definition of that is) on guitar is going to take practice and dedication. It's not impossible to reach whatever goal(s) you want to achieve on guitar.

I've learned (from lessons) to tackle one song at a time, as trying to learn multiple songs at once gets me overwhelmed and I feel discouraged. You need to go in to each practice session with a goal in mind, like "I'm gonna play this scale or song at ____ bpm (beats per minute)." Buy a metronome to keep time (and track your progress). In addition, you should practice scales and maybe learn a new technique each session (hammer on, pull offs, for example) and use your practice time to really get them down.

if someone's been playing guitar for a year I expect that they know basic chords (G, C, Am, D, F, E, Em), basic strumming patterns, the names of the strings, and simple strumming songs (like "Time of Your Life" by Green Day).


Reply posted 6 months ago by Jennifer Yamada


Say Hey Christopher,

I have a question for you. Just one. What are your expectations. Or, another way of asking, what did you expect of yourself after 11 months?

No, I do not want to be a professional musician. Though I have been playing over 45 years and jam with many pros. I love jamming with people and making up my own music. With all that said, let me express how I feel after a putting in tons of hours learning something, not only guitar but everything.

When I ask the same questions you are asking, it is our natural reality check. I think most of us, if not all, do this from time to time. If we didn’t pause and ask where was I, where am I, and where am I going, we would not care about what we are doing. We’d be a lump of coal.

By gaining a sense of accomplishment over time, we develop a kind of speedometer or learning ratio. Or another way of saying it, what have I learned over a given period of time. So by asking what do I know today about guitar that I did not know yesterday, last month, last year, and so forth we develop that ratio? As your guitar playing improves, this ratio changes –for the better I’d hope-.

You are doing just fine. I say this because you are asking!
Cheers mate, Jimmy Lair


Reply posted 6 months ago by Jim Lair



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